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Guide to Patagonia's Monsters & Mysterious beings

I have written a book on this intriguing subject which has just been published.
In this blog I will post excerpts and other interesting texts on this fascinating subject.

Austin Whittall


Friday, January 15, 2016

Humans in Siberia 10,000 years earlier than formerly believed,


Seems like human beings have been on the move for much longer than formerly believed. A paper published in Science (Early human presence in the Arctic: Evidence from 45,000-year-old mammoth remains Vladimir V. Pitulko, Alexei N. Tikhonov, Elena Y. Pavlova Pavel A. Nikolskiy, Konstantin E. Kuper, Roman N. Polozov, Science 15 Jan 2016:Vol. 351, Issue 6270, pp. 260-263 DOI: 10.1126/science.aad0554), mentions their discovery of a butchered mammoth, with clear signs of pre and post-mortem wounds caused by intelligent beings. The date is 45000 years ago, and pushes back the presence of humans in the area some 10,000 years.


The free-access text says:


"Earliest human Arctic occupation
Paleolithic records of humans in the Eurasian Arctic (above 66°N) are scarce, stretching back to 30,000 to 35,000 years ago at most. Pitulko et al. have found evidence of human occupation 45,000 years ago at 72°N, well within the Siberian Arctic. The evidence is in the form of a frozen mammoth carcass bearing many signs of weapon-inflicted injuries, both pre- and postmortem. The remains of a hunted wolf from a widely separate location of similar age indicate that humans may have spread widely across northern Siberia at least 10 millennia earlier than previously thought.
Abstract
Archaeological evidence for human dispersal through northern Eurasia before 40,000 years ago is rare. In west Siberia, the northernmost find of that age is located at 57°N. Elsewhere, the earliest presence of humans in the Arctic is commonly thought to be circa 35,000 to 30,000 years before the present. A mammoth kill site in the central Siberian Arctic, dated to 45,000 years before the present, expands the populated area to almost 72°N. The advancement of mammoth hunting probably allowed people to survive and spread widely across northernmost Arctic Siberia."


The place is well north of the Arctic Circle, at 72° north. Location map.


So they were there longer ago than expected which means they were equipped to reach America via the Arctic earlier than expected too. or Move out of America into Asia at an early date... After all, who said they were Homo sapiens? They could be Denisovans, archaic Asian or even archaic American hominins.



Patagonian Monsters - Cryptozoology, Myths & legends in Patagonia Copyright 2009-2016 by Austin Whittall © 

3 comments:

  1. I believe your final comment goes precisely to the point of the matter.
    Any hominin specie (pure or transicional) present at one of the extremes of the Behring strait could have crossed it, of course not at any time, but surely during any convenient climatic stage, and as you infere... in any of the two directions.
    The orthodox science only conceives an incoming flow into America, but the most severe prejudice I think they have, is that the candidate for early peopling is not just H. sapiens, ... they look indeed for behavourally modern H. Sapiens, which is even more restrictive. As a consequence of this, and particularly in South America, the most progressive dispersal model the local mainstream handles, does not support pre-LGM (Last Maximum Glacial 18 – 25 kya) sites,...that do exist.

    Best regards
    Marcelo

    ReplyDelete
  2. Just the path Amerindians would have taken if they, after exiting the Americas (OoAm), were looking for another door back into the Americas. They, the newly arriving and first “Old” World Homo sapiens sapiens/Amerindians, were exploring, for the first time, a new (Old) World in more directions than just across the Arctic; as they apparently hurried into Australia as some early dates suggest. These early dates from the Arctic point to the colonization of Eurasia from the northern and eastern extremes by way of the Bering Sea and/or Land Bridge out the backdoor from the Americas.
    Were the spear points made of bone or ivory? The American pre-Clovis scene suggests “bone before stone” and hints these arctic hunters came from the Americas. Might we also reference the relevance of Richard E. Morlan’s finds from the Yukon at an equivalent date?

    Morlan, Richard E., 1980. Taphonomy and Archaeology in the Upper Pleistocene of the Northern Yukon Territory: A Glimpse of the Peopling of the New World. National Mus. of Canada, Mercury Series, Arch. Survey of Canada Paper 94.

    Morlan, Richard E., 1983. "Pre-Clovis Occupation North of the Ice Sheets" in Early Man in the New World, edited by R. Shutler, Jr., pp. 47-63. Sage Publications, Beverly Hills.

    Morlan, Richard E., 1987. The Pleistocene Archaeology of Beringia. In The Evolution of Human Hunting, Edited by M.H. Nitecki And D.V. Nitecki, pp.267-307. Plenum Press, New York.

    and
    Bonnichsen, R., Young, D. 1980. Early Technological Repertoires: Bone to Stone. Can J Anthropol 1:123-128.
    and also William N. Irving;

    ReplyDelete
  3. Just the path Amerindians would have taken if they, after exiting the Americas (OoAm), were looking for another door back into the Americas. They, the newly arriving and first “Old” World Homo sapiens sapiens/Amerindians, were exploring, for the first time, a new (Old) World in more directions than just across the Arctic; as they apparently hurried into Australia as some early dates suggest. These early dates from the Arctic point to the colonization of Eurasia from the northern and eastern extremes by way of the Bering Sea and/or Land Bridge out the backdoor from the Americas.
    Were the spear points made of bone or ivory? The American pre-Clovis scene suggests “bone before stone” and hints these arctic hunters came from the Americas. Might we also reference the relevance of Richard E. Morlan’s finds from the Yukon at an equivalent date?

    Morlan, Richard E., 1980. Taphonomy and Archaeology in the Upper Pleistocene of the Northern Yukon Territory: A Glimpse of the Peopling of the New World. National Mus. of Canada, Mercury Series, Arch. Survey of Canada Paper 94.

    Morlan, Richard E., 1983. "Pre-Clovis Occupation North of the Ice Sheets" in Early Man in the New World, edited by R. Shutler, Jr., pp. 47-63. Sage Publications, Beverly Hills.

    Morlan, Richard E., 1987. The Pleistocene Archaeology of Beringia. In The Evolution of Human Hunting, Edited by M.H. Nitecki And D.V. Nitecki, pp.267-307. Plenum Press, New York.

    and
    Bonnichsen, R., Young, D. 1980. Early Technological Repertoires: Bone to Stone. Can J Anthropol 1:123-128.
    and also William N. Irving;

    ReplyDelete

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